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dc.contributor.authorNYAKECHO OWINO, HARRIET
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-17T06:33:28Z
dc.date.available2023-03-17T06:33:28Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-17
dc.identifier.otherHARRIET NYAKECHO OWINO
dc.identifier.urihttp://elibrary.pu.ac.ke/handle/123456789/1044
dc.descriptionAfrica, the cradle of humankind, is home to many cultures across its geographical regions that practice a wealth of spiritual belief systems. African spiritual practices were based on oral traditions and on knowledge and customs which were passed on during a variety of ceremonies and rituals. Smallholder farmers (SHF) in developing countries participate in all aspects of rural life including being custodians of their communities’ spiritual heritage. Busia County in western Kenya faces a myriad of challenges making food security situation unsustainable. Need for preservation of African spirituality through the staple food crop (SFC) value chain is an important food sovereignty intervention. Although the Government of Kenya has put into place measures aimed at preserving African spirituality, little is known about it in the context of food sovereignty. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between African spirituality and food sovereignty and how it is influenced by gender to achieve food security in Matayos Sub-County of Busia County, western Kenya. This study highlights interrelation between African spirituality and food sovereignty and their effect on food security among SHFs in the farming area. The general objectives of the study was to explore African spirituality in context of food sovereignty along the SFC value chain and the resultant effects on the food security of households in Matayos Sub-County. The study employed a cross-sectional survey design, utilizing a mixed study method. SHF households, along the SFC value chain were purposefully selected in the rural farming area. Under the quantitative method, a multistage sampling procedure was carried so as to purposively select households with a diversified crop production. Thereafter, every nth household of mixed gender was selected according to the population, targeting at least 399 households. Within the qualitative method, three (3) focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out along with six (6) case studies. Data collection involved a questionnaire, semi-structured interview schedule, observation checklists, voice recording and FGD guideline. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS version 23 and reported using descriptive statistics whereas qualitative data was checked for consistency and arranged thematically to enable analysis through triangulation with quantitative results and content analysis. Preliminary analysis demonstrated various spiritual beliefs among men and women related to the SFC value chain. The findings from the study established that a majority of the SHFs had knowledge of African spiritual beliefs and practices along the SFC value chain with (65%) of them in the affirmative and more males (53.8%) than females (34.5%) acknowledging African spirituality as a way of life as they engaged in their farming systems whereas the women systematically followed their leadership. Overall, in an attempt to augment the Kenya Government’s efforts in through the constitution, this study is useful in bringing on board the crucial but neglected spiritualties of smallholder farmer households in relation to food sovereignty. The application of this knowledge through policy will contribute to defining the food sovereignty of local communities in Kenya as they work towards local ownership of food system drivers thus improving the national food and nutrition security in geen_US
dc.description.abstractAfrica, the cradle of humankind, is home to many cultures across its geographical regions that practice a wealth of spiritual belief systems. African spiritual practices were based on oral traditions and on knowledge and customs which were passed on during a variety of ceremonies and rituals. Smallholder farmers (SHF) in developing countries participate in all aspects of rural life including being custodians of their communities’ spiritual heritage. Busia County in western Kenya faces a myriad of challenges making food security situation unsustainable. Need for preservation of African spirituality through the staple food crop (SFC) value chain is an important food sovereignty intervention. Although the Government of Kenya has put into place measures aimed at preserving African spirituality, little is known about it in the context of food sovereignty. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between African spirituality and food sovereignty and how it is influenced by gender to achieve food security in Matayos Sub-County of Busia County, western Kenya. This study highlights interrelation between African spirituality and food sovereignty and their effect on food security among SHFs in the farming area. The general objectives of the study was to explore African spirituality in context of food sovereignty along the SFC value chain and the resultant effects on the food security of households in Matayos Sub-County. The study employed a cross-sectional survey design, utilizing a mixed study method. SHF households, along the SFC value chain were purposefully selected in the rural farming area. Under the quantitative method, a multistage sampling procedure was carried so as to purposively select households with a diversified crop production. Thereafter, every nth household of mixed gender was selected according to the population, targeting at least 399 households. Within the qualitative method, three (3) focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out along with six (6) case studies. Data collection involved a questionnaire, semi-structured interview schedule, observation checklists, voice recording and FGD guideline. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS version 23 and reported using descriptive statistics whereas qualitative data was checked for consistency and arranged thematically to enable analysis through triangulation with quantitative results and content analysis. Preliminary analysis demonstrated various spiritual beliefs among men and women related to the SFC value chain. The findings from the study established that a majority of the SHFs had knowledge of African spiritual beliefs and practices along the SFC value chain with (65%) of them in the affirmative and more males (53.8%) than females (34.5%) acknowledging African spirituality as a way of life as they engaged in their farming systems whereas the women systematically followed their leadership. Overall, in an attempt to augment the Kenya Government’s efforts in through the constitution, this study is useful in bringing on board the crucial but neglected spiritualties of smallholder farmer households in relation to food sovereignty. The application of this knowledge through policy will contribute to defining the food sovereignty of local communities in Kenya as they work towards local ownership of food system drivers thus improving the national food and nutrition security in geen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPwani Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPwani Universityen_US
dc.subjectFOOD SECURITYen_US
dc.subjectFOOD SOVEREIGNTYen_US
dc.titleTHE NEXUS BETWEEN AFRICAN SPIRITUALITY, FOOD SOVEREIGNTY AND FOOD SECURITY: A GENDER BASED CASE STUDY OF SMALLHOLDER FARMERS IN MATAYOS SUB-COUNTY, BUSIA COUNTY, KENYAen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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