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dc.contributor.authorKombe, Clarice A.
dc.contributor.authorOjwang, Loice M.
dc.contributor.authorMaghanga, Justin K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-08T05:45:12Z
dc.date.available2020-12-08T05:45:12Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-30
dc.identifier.citationKombe, C., Ojwang, L., & Maghanga, J. (2019). Influence of Nutrients on Seagrass Distribution in Malindi, Kenya. Kenya Aquatica Journal, 5(1), 9–18.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2617-4936
dc.identifier.urihttp://elibrary.pu.ac.ke/handle/123456789/848
dc.description.abstractSeagrass are marine flowering plants that occupy both tidal and subtidal marine environments. They are highly productive ecosystems that are useful indicators of environmental health due to their sensitivity to changes in the quality of the marine environment. Nutrients enrichment is known to be a leading cause in the declining of seagrass meadows worldwide. The changes of seagrass and the effects of nutrients fluctuations on their distribution pattern in Malindi have not been documented widely. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of nutrients on the distribution of seagrass in Malindi. Malindi Marine Park (MMP) sites were selected; one at the, the Malindi Marine Reserve (MMR), and the Malindi Marine Buffer (MMB) zone. At each site 30m transects were laid perpendicularly to the shore and samples collected in triplicate at intervals of 10m. Water and sediment samples were collected using plastic bottles and corers, respectively. Nutrients (nitrates, nitrites, ammonia and phosphates) in both water and sediments were analysed colorimetrically. Five species, viz Thalassia hemprichii, Enhalus acoroides, Syringodium isoetifolium, Cymodocea serrulata and Thalassodendron ciliatum were identified throughout the sites. Nutrients in sediment were generally higher than in water. Total biomass was predominantly influenced by nitrates (r=-0.141) and nitrites (r=+0.488) in sediments and ammonia (r=-0.364) and nitrites (r=+0.50) in water. The Malindi marine environment could still be oligotrophic but further studies across greater timescales and space are required to unravel seagrass variations due to tourism, urbanization and watershed changes, it was recommended that such be integrated in the monthly monitoring effort of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) and Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) efforts of the National Environment Management Authority (NEMA).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute and Pwani Universityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKenya Aquatica Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesA Scientific Journal of Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute;
dc.subjectSeagrassen_US
dc.subjectBiomassen_US
dc.subjectNutrients-enrichmenten_US
dc.subjectMarine environmenten_US
dc.titleInfluence of Nutrients on Seagrass Distribution in Malindi, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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